Design

Vacations

Jan 19, 2016

These past few days, I’ve been working on a feature that’s been on my to-do list for over a year now—vacations (or holidays... or breaks... or leave... depending on where you live). Regardless of the name, the gist is that you’ll be able to block off spans of time throughout the year when you plan to not work. These breaks could be a trip to another country, a staycation, or even a sabbatical—it doesn’t matter. Their purpose is to provide a visual of when you plan to take off, so you don’t accidentally schedule a project at the same time.

vacations-tooltip

In the interface, vacations live alongside timelines, as a global object with no parent associations besides the user. Because of this, they’ll appear in any schedule graph for planning, like the clients or projects view. They won’t appear in the invoices view because I consider that to be a schedule graph for tracking. Vacations don’t factor into when you issue invoices or receive payment from a client, so there’s no need to include them there.

vacations-table

From a structural standpoint, vacations are pretty simple—they have a description, a start date, and an end date. From there, Cushion can calculate a vacation’s duration as well as how long until it begins—the “countdown”. I thought about including a “location” field, which could be a fun detail, but I didn’t want to assume that everyone would treat a vacation as a trip away from home. First and foremost, vacations are indicators of when you’re not working—completely agnostic of where you are or what you’re doing in your time off.

vacations-insight

As of today, I finished the ability to create vacations and include them in the schedule graph. I also have plans for smart interactions throughout Cushion. For example, if you try to create a project that spans a vacation, Cushion will give you a heads-up, so you can think twice about taking that project.

As for the name “Vacations”, I thought a lot about this and considered what it would mean for people outside the US. After speaking with international users, it’s clear that “vacation” is understood, but not a commonly used term. In Europe, “holiday” is more common, but in the US, “holiday” only means government or religion-recognized days, like Christmas or Thanksgiving. “Holiday” is never used to indicate personal time off in the US. In New Zealand, “leave” is the more appropriate term. I also considered “break”, which is the most impartial, but not exactly clear when taken out of context.

In the end, I decided to go with “Vacations” as the default, but allow users to switch it to “Holiday” in the preferences. I might even work in some fancy UX to default to “Holiday” if the user’s timezone is outside the US. In any case, I’m certain that people will be thrilled to have this feature.

I’ve spoken to dozens of users who desperately need the ability to block out time off—many of which hacked Cushion to represent vacations using projects under a “Vacation” client. Personally, I can’t wait for vacations. I’m mostly excited to see a visual of my time off and learn more about my work/life balance. Am I taking enough time off? Do I follow a consistent pattern, or are my breaks on more of a need-basis?

I hope to have vacations wrapped up this week, so keep an eye out if you use Cushion. If you have any ideas in the meantime, I’d love to hear them.

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Archive

  1. Funding Cushion
    Story
  2. Hiring a Team of Freelancers
    Story
  3. Taking a Real Break From Work
    Story
  4. Slack as a Notification Center
    Dev
  5. Document Your Features
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  6. 300
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  7. Vacations
    Design
  8. Offering Discounts
    Design
  9. Waves of Traffic
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  10. Less Blogging, More Journaling
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  11. Retention Through Useful Features
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  12. The Onboarding Checklist
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  13. Spreading the Word
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  14. From Beta to Launch - The Subdomain
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  15. From Beta to Launch - Sign up
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  16. From Beta to Launch - Messaging
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  17. Launch
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  18. Authenticating with 3rd Party Services
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  19. Intro to Integrations
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  20. Inspiration vs Imitation
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  21. The Emotional Rollercoaster
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  22. Designing Project Blocks
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  23. Everything in Increments
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  24. Deleting Your Account
    Design
  25. Designing the Subscription Page
    Design
  26. Rewriting the Timeline
    Dev
  27. Restructuring the Individual Project Page
    Design
  28. Project Blocks
    Story
  29. Redesigning the Homepage
    Design
  30. Multiple Timelines
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  31. Archiving and Estimate Differences
    Design
  32. Multiple Financial Goals
    Design
  33. Zooming in on the Timeline
    Design
  34. Currency
    Dev
  35. Preferences, Accounts, and a Typeface Change
    Design
  36. Sending Out the First Email
    Story
  37. Currency Inputs, Notifications, and Invoice Nets
    Design
  38. Dots and Lines
    Design
  39. Calculating in the Database and Revealing Tendencies
    Dev
  40. Improved Form UX
    Design
  41. Cushion is Online
    Story
  42. Schedule Timeline Patterns
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  43. A Slimmer Schedule Timeline
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  44. The Schedule Timeline
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  45. Plugging in Real Data for the First Time
    Design
  46. Transitions and Project Lists
    Design
  47. Death to Modals
    Design
  48. The Individual Project Page
    Design
  49. Estimated Incomes and Talks with Other Freelancers
    Story
  50. Statuses to Lists and the Paid Beta
    Story
  51. The Timeline
    Story
  52. Invoice Terminology
    Dev
  53. Modal Forms
    Dev
  54. Wiring the Backend to the Frontend
    Dev
  55. Balancing Design and Dev
    Story
  56. Timecop, Monocle, and Vagrant
    Dev
  57. Going with Ruby and Sinatra
    Dev
  58. Ditching local-first and trying out Node.js
    Dev
  59. Switching to AngularJS
    Dev
  60. Building the Table with Vue.js
    Dev
  61. Clients, Projects, and Invoices
    Dev
  62. Introduction
    Story

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