Design

Offering Discounts

Jan 15, 2016

Recently, I’ve been partnering with freelancing communities and conferences in an attempt to get Cushion in front of more freelancers. I wish I could send out a beacon to alert all freelancers of Cushion’s existence because I know there are countless people who still don’t know about it. This kills me. Spreading the word is slow, but I’m getting there little by little.

In partnering with relevant groups, I can provide these communities and conferences with a discount to offer their members or attendees. This helps both of us by providing them with more value to extend to their guests while I get potential new users.

offering-discounts-referrals

I started handing out discounts by “hacking” my own referral system. The referral system relies on a URL with a referral code attached to it. Each user has his/her own referral link, which gets them a $10 credit for each user they’re able to subscribe. The referred user gets a month free to start—pretty standard.

A while back, a conference reached out, asking if they could make Cushion a sponsor and offer a Cushion discount to their attendees. Of course! I’d take that deal any day. At the time, I didn’t have a proper discount system in place, but I did have the referral system.

I created a new user for the conference and changed that account’s referral link to a memorable code that could be given to attendees. Fortunately, the referral system includes basic analytics, like who signed up with the code (by nickname) and who became a paying customer. This worked well, but I wasn’t ready to create a new user for every conference that wanted a discount.

offering-discounts-stripe

I decided to spend a day putting together a quick discount system on the back of Stripe, which already handles coupons and discounts incredibly well. I manage the coupons in Stripe’s dashboard and Cushion listens for any changes. Whenever I create a coupon in Stripe’s dashboard, Cushion receives an event and stores the coupon locally, so I don’t need to make any requests to Stripe.

offering-discounts-signup

When a user signs up, I check if they’re using a coupon. If they are, I display the discount along with a “thanks” to the person or organization that gave it to them.

offering-discounts-subscription

Later, when the user is deciding whether to subscribe, Cushion displays their discount, so there’s no question that it exists and will be applied if they hit subscribe.

The discount system on signup is only for public discounts, which are typically a free month on top of the trial—I’d gladly give that discount to anyone if it’d make them more likely to subscribe. I also have special discounts that I give to close friends or people who help me out. I wouldn’t want these discounts to be out in the open, so I tag them as private in Cushion. That tag prevents them from being used by anyone—I have to manually add them to an account.

I’d love to get Cushion in the hands of more people, so if you know a community, conference, or event that would benefit from a Cushion discount, let me know!

Also, if you’re interested in trying Cushion, use this link for a discount. (What kind of person would I be if I didn’t include a discount in the post about discounts!)

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Archive

  1. Restructuring an Evolving App: Part 1
    Design
  2. My Typical Week as a Startup Founder
    Story
  3. Building Components in a Sandbox
    Dev
  4. Reactive Time with Vue.js
    Dev
  5. Visualizing Daylight Saving Time
    Dev
  6. Recording Screencast GIFs
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  7. Writing a Job Listing
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  8. Using Feature Flags to Run Betas
    Dev
  9. Our First Company Lunch
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  10. How to embed Vue.js & Vuex inside an AngularJS app... wait what?
    Dev
  11. Funding Cushion
    Story
  12. Hiring a Team of Freelancers
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  13. Taking a Real Break From Work
    Story
  14. Slack as a Notification Center
    Dev
  15. Document Your Features
    Story
  16. 300
    Story
  17. Vacations
    Design
  18. Offering Discounts
    Design
  19. Waves of Traffic
    Story
  20. Less Blogging, More Journaling
    Story
  21. Retention Through Useful Features
    Design
  22. The Onboarding Checklist
    Design
  23. Spreading the Word
    Story
  24. From Beta to Launch - The Subdomain
    Dev
  25. From Beta to Launch - Sign up
    Design
  26. From Beta to Launch - Messaging
    Design
  27. Launch
    Story
  28. Authenticating with 3rd Party Services
    Dev
  29. Intro to Integrations
    Design
  30. Inspiration vs Imitation
    Story
  31. The Emotional Rollercoaster
    Story
  32. Designing Project Blocks
    Design
  33. Everything in Increments
    Story
  34. Deleting Your Account
    Design
  35. Designing the Subscription Page
    Design
  36. Rewriting the Timeline
    Dev
  37. Restructuring the Individual Project Page
    Design
  38. Project Blocks
    Story
  39. Redesigning the Homepage
    Design
  40. Multiple Timelines
    Design
  41. Archiving and Estimate Differences
    Design
  42. Multiple Financial Goals
    Design
  43. Zooming in on the Timeline
    Design
  44. Currency
    Dev
  45. Preferences, Accounts, and a Typeface Change
    Design
  46. Sending Out the First Email
    Story
  47. Currency Inputs, Notifications, and Invoice Nets
    Design
  48. Dots and Lines
    Design
  49. Calculating in the Database and Revealing Tendencies
    Dev
  50. Improved Form UX
    Design
  51. Cushion is Online
    Story
  52. Schedule Timeline Patterns
    Design
  53. A Slimmer Schedule Timeline
    Design
  54. The Schedule Timeline
    Design
  55. Plugging in Real Data for the First Time
    Design
  56. Transitions and Project Lists
    Design
  57. Death to Modals
    Design
  58. The Individual Project Page
    Design
  59. Estimated Incomes and Talks with Other Freelancers
    Story
  60. Statuses to Lists and the Paid Beta
    Story
  61. The Timeline
    Story
  62. Invoice Terminology
    Dev
  63. Modal Forms
    Dev
  64. Wiring the Backend to the Frontend
    Dev
  65. Balancing Design and Dev
    Story
  66. Timecop, Monocle, and Vagrant
    Dev
  67. Going with Ruby and Sinatra
    Dev
  68. Ditching local-first and trying out Node.js
    Dev
  69. Switching to AngularJS
    Dev
  70. Building the Table with Vue.js
    Dev
  71. Clients, Projects, and Invoices
    Dev
  72. Introduction
    Story

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